A View From The Bridge

A Young Vic Production broadcast to Odeon Cinema, Bridgend by National Theatre Live
A View From The Bridge by Arthur Miller

The running time was about 1 hour and 55 minutes with no interval.

Before entering we were given an A4 sheet with information and advertising upcoming plays that will be broadcast.

Cast
Marco – Emun Elliott
Catherine – Phoebe Fox
Alfieri – Micheal Gould
Louis – Richard Hansell
Officer – Padraig Lynch
Rodolpho – Luke Norris
Eddie – Mark Strong
Beatrice – Nicola Walker
Directed by Ivo Van Hove
Design & Light by Jan Versweyveld

Before the performance started we have an introduction by someone with a microphone in the theatre stood in a box and a short video of Van and Jan talking about how British theatre doesn’t have certain things and they dislike it. Great. It really got me into the mood to support their production. I remember Tsui Hark stating at the Beijing Olympics how no other country could ever do something like their opening ceremony. I remember a German lecturer at university mocking his students, in about 2004, about how Britain doesn’t have chip and pin unlike his home country (We did eventually). I dislike arrogance and the declaration that the country they have worked in is inferior to their home country. It creates unnecessary animosity.

Mark Strong I have seen in a few things but it’s safe to say he is an excellent actor and can easily hold his own even with the ‘heavyweights’ as the play relies on his central performance as the tragic protagonist of the piece. Phoebe Fox puts on a very good Brooklyn accent.

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The set design is minimalist boarding avant-garde by its starkness. You have a door leading from the rear of the stage with a small step-come-stoop. In front of this is a knee high enclosed area with benching above a glass wall. There are benches on the side of the stage where people are sat. I think they are audience but due to the tight camera angles I get flash backs to when I saw a Welsh National Opera production of the Barber of Seville where they had a fake audience, dressed in period costume, sat to the sides of the stage watching events unfold. At one point a chair is brought out of Marco to lift by the leg one handed with some overly dramatic music and a static pose for a minute (which usually marks the end of the first act before the interval hence its intended poignancy is lost due to there being no interval) but apart from that there are no props used.

A View From The Bridge Stage

Apart from this another unique aspect of the production visually is that everyone walks in this enclosed area barefoot. It was as if Van and Jan secretly have a Tarrantino level foot fetish and want to be sure their fellow fetishists can get a visual of the peoples feet at all times.

At the start of the play two of the characters are showering and drying themselves off. At the end of the play, instead of Eddie producing a knife during the dénouement, the ensemble huddle together, as if in a rugby scrum, and a torrent of blood showers down upon them from above. At the end of the play Beatrice holds the dying Eddie as everyone is bathed in his blood. Of course this is symbolic that the running theme of honour and vendettas that runs through the Italian-American community taints them all.

The major running theme of Italian immigrants bringing the ‘old’ traditions of what family and honour are, in contrast to the emerging new more liberal ‘Americanised’ generation, runs throughout the play. Eddie wants Catherine to get an education, and someone deserving of her, but can’t bring himself to accept her personal choices and union with the effeminate, in his eyes, Rodolpho. At the end of the play Marco, who embodies the ‘old’ traditions, ultimately proves how Eddie is a tragic figure as he exists in a hinterland between being modern, like Rodolpho, and maintaining the tradition of the community to not betray others. Alfieri acts as a quasi-narrator of the events serving as a foil to Eddie as Eddie believes himself to maintain the traditions while Alfieri has adapted to the new country and reiterates how tragic it is that people cannot compromise which ultimately leads to Eddie betraying his ideals and Marco becoming a murderer based on nothing more that pride and honour when the events were unnecessary. Themes of the differences between generations, the differences in cultures of immigrants and those around them who have naturalised successfully and those who retain the mind-set of ‘the old country’, the hubris of pride and many other issues are addressed during the play.

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It was an impressive staging and all the actors were excellent. I came into this play completely unaware of what it was about which is rare or me. It is a very serious play dealing with the concept of honour so still rings very true to our current generation albeit the background of the community may have changed. As it was broadcast no doubt there will be a repeat of the performance I saw but if you have a chance to see the play be aware it is a very serious, what ‘luvvies’ might consider ‘worthy’ play. As someone said after it ended “I liked it but I can’t say I enjoyed it” – it is a social commentary play not an entertainment play and it’s important that at least once in a while we challenge our own sense of comfort and address these questions even if we cannot immediately say that the experience was pleasant.


As all the seating was priced equally I got to try the premium seats you usually walk past in the cinema. Very nice and plenty of leg room to the point you dont have to get up to let people past but not worth paying more.

I’ve been told to try and write shorter pieces so i feel this entry is incomplete.

Comments, etc, are welcome.

Next a sort of overview of the two times I have been to Acapela Studio in Pentyrch, Cardiff.

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mrhearne

Poetry, theatre, literature, films, reviews and various other matters. Primarily Russian and Welsh subjects.

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