Wałęsa. Człowiek z nadziei [Walesa, Man of Hope] 2013 film

A 2013 Polish biopic film about the leader of the trade union Solidarity movement (and later president of Poland) Lech Walesa by Andrzej Wajda. The film was selected as the Polish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 86th Academy Awards, but was not nominated. Recently, on 10/01/2017, this film was shown on BBC4.

Synopsis:

Lech Wałęsa, an electrician at the Gdańsk Shipyards, participated in local demonstrations during the 1970s which became violent and left their mark on him after he returned to his daily routine. Ten years later, a new uprising occurred and unexpectedly became a charismatic leader of the Polish dockworkers.

Wałęsa’s leadership role signifies the beginning of a new movement that successfully overcomes the country’s Communist regime, and Wałęsa is pushed into representing the majority of Poland’s population. The Soviet Union authorities, previously regarded as too powerful to be confronted, eventually tolerate existence of the movement a degree. However he is at one point taken from his home in the middle of the night by Soviet officials to an unknown location. On their journey there they pass a road and Lech declares that the people will support him but his escort laugh at this and tell him to open his window and ask the people themselves. On the roadside are some poor farmers who tell him they hate him and he has done nothing to help them. At the interrogation location he is fed and openly shows defiance to the authorities before being eventually released when it’s clear they will get nothing from him. Later we see his wife accepting the Nobel peace prize on his behalf in 1983 as he believed if he left the country he would not be allowed back in.

The film ends on a note of Soviet members saying they will get him and Wałęsa being left unchallenged by opponents. The Polish example of the group Solidarity causes a domino effect throughout Eastern Europe. People in Eastern Germany follow the Polish example, starting demonstrations for freedom which achieves a peaceful reunification of Germany. The Soviet Union then dissolved alongside Yugoslavia.

In the epilogue we are told that while Europe is reshaped, Poland remains stable and peaceful. Yet a huge variety of political parties unfold and Poland is on the brink of becoming as ungovernable as the late Weimar Republic. Wałęsa is subsequently elected as the first president of the new Polish democracy; but, this is followed by feelings of resentment among the Polish people who start to think that Wałęsa is becoming overly privileged. Consequently, the Polish people start to seek out ways to diminish Wałęsa’s significance, until they finally accomplish their goal through uncovering actions from a past period.

Cast:
Robert Więckiewicz as Lech Wałęsa
Agnieszka Grochowska as Danuta Wałęsa
Zbigniew Zamachowski as Nawiślak
Maria Rosaria Omaggio as Oriana Fallaci
Cezary Kosiński as Majchrzak
Mirosław Baka as Klemens Gniech
Iwona Bielska as Ilona, Wałęsa’s neighbour
Maciej Stuhr as Priest
Małgorzata Zajączkowska as Shop assistant
Marcin Hycnar as KOR member Rysiek
Dorota Wellman as Henryka Krzywonos
Adam Woronowicz as Tadeusz Fiszbach
Marcin Perchuć as Instruktor
Ewa Kuryło as Anna Walentynowicz
Arkadiusz Detmer as Malinowski
Mateusz Kościukiewicz as Krzysiek
Piotr Probosz as Mijak
Ewa Kolasińska as Shipyard worker
Michał Czernecki
Remigiusz Jankowski as Shipyard worker
Wojciech Kalarus as Chairman
Maciej Marczewski as KOR member
Maciej Konopiński as SB agent
Marcel Głogowski as Bogdan Wałęsa (aged 8–10)
Wiktor Malinowski as Jarosław Wałęsa (aged 3–5)
Kamil Jaworski as Przemysław Wałęsa (aged 5–7)
Jakub Świderski as Ludwik Prądzyński
Bogusław Kudłek as Bogdan Borusewicz
Michał Meyer as Jerzy Borowczak
Grzegorz Małecki as UB agent
Ewa Konstancja Bułhak as Customs official
Damian Jagusz as soldier

Review:
Be honest – if you read that synopsis and didn’t think ‘this is propaganda’ then your not being critical. This is a view you must take with any biographical works as inevitably there will be a bias present no matter the intent. Either the subject themselves, in the case of autobiographies, is editting the truth in order to better fit their personal self image or intentionally presenting an image they wish to be accepted as true or, in third party works, you are viewing the events through the perception of someone interpreting their subject for better or worse. It reminds me about someone who once told me they only read biographies because they deal in reality while fiction is just make believe. For such people this film will be accepted at face value.

Andrzej Wajda is a freind of Lech Wałęsa and so there is inevitably a bias. This film romanticises events in favour of depicting Lech Walesa as a man of the people who never did anything questionable. It is a love letter to him displaying his defiant, outspoken behaviour and being seen to be rarely challenged successfully in his opposition to the Soviet era establishment. It is highly romanticised not in it’s imagery, as Wadja’s style is distinctly realist and unsensational (barring a few concessions to cinematic flare), but in how we are presented Lech’s personality, showing him often making political statements and being in control of any enviroment he is in – even when he is taken by the secret police from his family to be interrogated.

Many scenes of the film include achive footage in which the faces of the actors are superimposed onto the footage of the person they are playing. Due to the low quality of the footage in compariosn to modern high definition imagery this is done quite effectively although I would wonder if it feels jarring for those familiar with the real life individuals and this footage in its original form. Apart from this we have dramatisations of Lech’s personal life which presumably has been sourced from multiple accounts to create as close to the actual events as possible – or maybe it’s just from Lech’s perspective and therefore favours his interpretation of events.

In the final third of the film, once he is held by the Soviet authorities, all we have is speculation based on his personal accounts of events. My issue with this? In most of this film we have the intergration of modern and contemporary footage (with the actor’s faces placed over those of the actual historical figures they play) which lends itself to making us unable to distinguish which parts are fact and which parts are further along the sliding scale of fact towards we accept as ‘historical fact’.

What I mean by this is we can only base our knowledge on the accounts given by people of the time and any evidence we are able to establish. History is only what we are told happened and which re-enforces the oft cited cliche ‘the victor writes history’ as we are discovering, time and time again, when historians go back to events long ago and uncover new evidence that the previously accepted ‘truth’ is not what actually happened but was a biased interpretations of events from the perspective of one side.

Why note this distinction between fact and historical fact? This film is doing its best to establish Wałęsa’s legacy as an unquestionably noble figure who did no wrong in his lifetime to achieve his goals and yet there is a challenge to such a perception of him nowadays. Recently Wałęsa has faced accussations of colluding with the Soviet government which he vehemently denies despite growing evidence to the contrary. In the closing minutes of the film we see his interrorgaters comment, to almost cartoonish effect, they will ‘get him later’. This moment works to make the audience also refute any later accusations of collusion they will hear including those currently being discussed in light of new evidence. After all who do we believe – the Soviet authorities who are well known to have used certain methods and obscured the reality of events often or this idealised man of the people?

Further to the cartoonishly villainous declaration of revenge we are given a brief summary, via text on the screen, relaying what occurred after the events depicted. One of these asserts that because of Wałęsa’s actions, and the rise of the Solidarity group, Poland led other Eastern Bloc nations towards rebelling against Soviet control and thus were key in the fall of the Berlin Wall.

This film presented an oversimplification of historical events regarding the downfall of the Soviet Union in it’s closing moments by suggesting Wałęsa’s actions, singlehandedly, began the sequence of events that led to the collapse of the Soviet Union. There were a great many other world events and internal problems within the Soviet union which led to its downfall so this film, as I have already mentioned, acts as propaganda attempting to secure the legacy of Wałęsa as one of the great historical figures in the history not just of Poland, which has been so hard fought for throughout the centuries by its citizens, but of the world.

He comes across as a historical figure not a man in this film. An image not a living person similar to how canonised saints are depicted. We have seen this time and time again in biopics which cherrypick what is depicted, how it is depicted and perhaps this is why I tend to avoid watching them because ultimately what we are watching is personality propaganda and not a fair account of the individual’s life. Rarely are such films a fair representation of what actually occurred let alone the unblemished, and sometimes unpalatable, truth. Often they instead iconise their subject either as hero or villain.

A caricature who is defined as representing some noble cause and whose example (of their mythos, not their reality) we should follow, is presented to the audience and we are asked to accept it blindly. There are too many examples of biopics being more fiction than fact but that is something to discuss another day. What is safe to say is that the actions of characters in the film must fit the narrative even if it warps the character of the real life person. Examples I can give off the top of my head are First Officer William Murdoch’s depiction in the 1997 film Titanic and of Vivian Liberto Cash in 2005’s Walk The Line both of whom were depicted negatively to enhance the focus narrative without thought to real world events.

Secondary to depictions of Wałęsa are those of the Italian reporter Oriana Fallaci, who is interviewing him as part of the film’s framing device. She is also somewhat of a caricature of the real life person and the choice for her to be used is itself indicative of Wadja’s intentions. Here she is depicted as the classic image all journalists wish to be seen as. Partisan yet invested. Distant yet intimate with their subject. Taking a stand against perceived injustices in the world yet never personally being involved (or indeed effected by it save, as journalist’s often do to create repore in hopes of exposing weakness in their subject, to express a few half hearted suggestions of sympathy – but never empathy). To be objective though they edit what they write and thus can never truly ignore their own experiences in life thus fostering an image which often overshadows the subject they cover. A journalist’s journalist.

The real life Fallaci often came into conflict with Muslims regarding her outspoken criticism of communities both in the East and West while she maintained an aloof air of superiority over them both. During her 1972 interview with Henry Kissinger, Kissinger stated that the Vietnam War was a “useless war” and compared himself to “the cowboy who leads the wagon train by riding ahead alone on his horse”. Kissinger later claimed that it was “the single most disastrous conversation I have ever had with any member of the press”. In 1973, she interviewed Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. She later stated, “He considers women simply as graceful ornaments, incapable of thinking like a man, and then strives to give them complete equality of rights and duties”.

It is hard to suggest that this image isn’t based on one Oriana herself made every effort to enforce during her life through her actions, often intended to incite reaction, and not just Wadja trying to lend further credence to his biopic by using a respected real life journalist in the framing device. She, like any others, was more a journalist seeking glory and building her reputation through conflict than making a difference in the world through her work and reporting things people do not want to accept as reality. Despite the heavily doctored image she seemed to wish to portray of herself fault always lay outside the individual as was the case when she blamed her lung cancer on her stay in Kuwait in 1991 after Saddam Hussein had ordered troops to burn hundreds of oil well alone and not that she had been, by choice, a lifelong heavy smoker. And in this film the fault lay exclusively with the Soviets never with how people did not rise up and challenge them before Wałęsa ascension to, what this film is mythologising as, a figurehead.

Summary:
On many aspects of the film I can find no fault. The acting is impactful, the cinematography up to the standard you would expect of a world class director such as Andrzej Wajda (who sadly passed away 9 October 2016) and it really has the sense, if not the most accurate depiction, of the 1980s in Poland. It is solidly built but the message it wishes to express seems, as with any biographical work, to have a desire to frame events in a certain light and omit anything unseemly in order to create a streamlined mythological narrative about its subject – to create an icon rather than relate a flawed, but inspirational, subject.

My greatest critcism is that Andrzej Wajda considered Lech a personal friend and I feel that this caused him to not cast a critical eye upon his subject. This has led, in this love letter of a film to his freind, to the embellishment of a historical figure and securing of his legacy. It deminishes the moments of true opposition faced in order to secure the heroic, incontestable, historical mythos of Wałęsa. The reason people watch a biopic or read an (auto)biography is to see the person behind the facade but sadly, as is often the case, all we get is a re-enforcement of what was already presented to us elsewhere. If you want an introduction to the life and times of Wałęsa then this is good enough as a biased crib notes like starting point but don’t expect any insight into him or how the Soviet era effected Poland beyond trade union strikes.

If you are interested in the works of Andrzej Wajda, or depictions of Poland under Communist rule, I strongly recommend you go watch Wadja’s Man of Marble (Polish: Człowiek z marmuru) or its sequel Man of Iron (Polish: Człowiek z żelaza) which depict fictionalised characters’ experiences covering the events of the Solidarity movement. In these Wajda is less sentimental about his subject and can better present the moral ‘truth’ of events without concern for offending a friend as has sadly occurred with this biopic made far later in his career.

Ankylosaurus by Wes Magee

He could well be a tank or a battering ram,
has a tail that could mash blood and bone into jam.
A pebble-dash back and a tortoise-shell skin,
and lips that curled up in an old witch’s grin.
It had been reported that he’d entered for
the first Mecca contest for Miss Dinosaur.
When the poor judges saw the sharp spikes on this bloke
three turned quite white, and the fourth had a stroke.
They quickly declared him the ugliest there
so the beast ate them up in a minute.

by Wes Magee

Russian Short Stories To Read Over The New Year and Christmas Period

Happy New Year to you all! Blwyddyn Newydd Dda! С новым годом!

New Year’s Day and to a lesser extent Christmas are a major holidayperiod in Russia and of course some of her greatest writers wrote stories set during this time of year.

You may wonder why I titled this entry with New Year preceding Christmas. The answer is quite simple: In Russia the Eastern Orthodox Church follows the Julian calender and thus celebrates Christmas Day on or near January 7. This date works to be December 25, in the Julian Calender, which pre-dates the Gregorian calendar most of us use today.

Nonetheless here is the reading list for you to choose from:

  • THE NEW YEAR’S TREE by Mikhail Zoshchenko
  • THE BOYS by Anton Chekhov
  • A CHRISTMAS TREE AND A WEDDING by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • AT CHRISTMASTIDE by Anton Chekhov
  • DREAM OF A YOUNG TSAR by Lev Tolstoy
  • MAKAR’S DREAM by Vladimir Korolenko
  • A WOMAN’S KINGDOM by Anton Chekhov
  • A DISTANT CHRISTMAS EVE by Kaudia Lukashevich
  • THE LITTLE BOY AT CHRIST’S CHRISTMAS TREE by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • CHRISTMAS PHANTOMS by Maxim Gorky, A LIFELESS ANIMAL by Teffi (a.k.a. Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya)
  • MY LAST CHRISTMAS by Mikhail Zoshchenko

There are no doubt many others so if you have any recommendations please leave a comment.

Star Wars : Rogue One : Trading Cards

£1.00 per pack from tesco.
Produced by Topps.
8 cards per pack. Each package comes with one of the main characters on the front so even the packaging itself has some value to collectors of such things.

“Over 210 cards to collect. 8 cards per pack.
Including one holographic foil card.
Look out for special cards inside lucky packets:
Plastic cards 1:4
Sticker Cards 1:4
Limited edition card to replace regular card 1:36 packets”

The cards I got were:

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26: Stormtrooper. Nice and generic just like them.

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35: Jyn Erso… I’m not sure if this is production art prior to the actress’ casting but that is definitely not Felicity Jones. Either that or it is an unflattering shot of her. Either way the image has been overworked by post edit photoshopping.
37: Cassian Andor: In a kneeling stance ready to fire his rifle. A promotional image no doubt.He looks surprised or scared doesn’t he?

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83: Death Trooper: stats card. Height: 6′ 5” Allegiance: Galactic Empire. The card has a ‘worn’ red/green patterning to it. I remember that from the 90s. I suppose it’s meant to look ‘punk’ but in an inoffensive way or as if this has been weathered in a conflict zone.

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113: The top right corner of a nine part image: 3 X-Wings and the Topps logo. (You can see the split between the two card faintly at Baze’s hairline).
116: The Left middle section of the 9 part image: Baze Malbus and Bodhi Rook. Of these section of the multipart big poster image (every card collection has at least one) I can’t complain as, looking on the back of the card at the full 9 part image I see that, apart from the robot K-2SO, I got the best framed cards of the set as neither of the men has his face severely cut up nor is there any vague midbody shot. They don’t stand fantastically on their own but of the 9 these were amongst the best.

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138: A slightly blurred action still of Baze Malbus running from an explosion of sparks behind him. In this day and age of HD I was quite surprised by it being blurred. They must have had access to a higher quality images than this? In fact this is one of the promotional images and has definitely been presented far more cleanly elsewhere.

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162: Cassian Andor: Holographic foil card: A promotional photo of the actor in costume. On the back it reads ” An accomplished Alliance Intelligence Officer with combat field experience, Captain Cassian Andor commands respect from his Rebel troops with his ability to keep a cool head under fire and complete his missions with minimal resources.” This and the Death Trooper were the only cards to have anything written on the back. The others had a close up of the front image with the Rogue One logo or, in the 9 part image it indicated the placement of the card in the larger image.

The surface of the cards I notice have a dappled texture with the printed images being smooth on top of it. The only one I have which was completely smooth was the holographic one so clearly these special ones are printed in a completely separate run to the more standard cards probably elsewhere.

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So my reaction… Trading cards seem so old fashioned to me as I remember them from my childhood and felt they had fallen out of fashion a long time ago. However ‘everything old is new again’ and there is no doubt that with a long running series like this there will be many adult collectors who have complete collections of previous series. The cards are very nice quality. A bit generic for my liking but what is to be done really as that was always an issue with trading cards?

Maybe a little pricey for what they are but if you get cards of characters you like, and once I see the film for all I know Cassian Andor might be the run away darkhorse favourite of the film, I might look at myself being incredible fortunate to have fluked getting probably the two best cards about him from picking up a pack at random and of course the Death Trooper and Storm Trooper cards no doubt are making a few jealous to have gotten them.

It is hard to tell after all some cards might be overpacked while others are under produced in a subtle effort to make you order them directly from the company so they can charge a bit more for anyone desperate to finish their collection and not spend money on random packs which by that point will statistically have a 7:1 or higher chance of being nothing but copies of ones they already have.

The price of £1 seems more than I would be willing to pay to be honest if I was going to have more than just a single packet. 80 pence or so would be more reasonable but considering how many they will have printed off for this internationally profitable property I think they could afford to lower the price to something like 50 to 75 pence if they really wanted to.
My advice… They’re a nice one off novelty but like all branded merchandise it is hard to say these will have much value a few months from now unless you have some of the more exceptionally rare cards. Which ironically won’t be the ‘1 per pack’ foil ones or the 1:4 plastic or 1:4 sticker cards I didn’t get but in fact the generic ones which will be underpacked and they’re ‘boring’ like the bottom corners of the 9 part image. Deny it but we all now know about how much the Yak Face toy goes for so maybe one day I will dig these out of the bottom of a draw and find they are worth something. They won’t, but it’s nice to dream.

Disney’s Frozen : Magic of the Northern Lights : Stickers

Made by Panini
Price: £0.50 per pack from Tesco so prices may vary

The artwork seems similar to that of Brittney Lee, who did the illustration work for the book ‘Frozen: A Sister More Like Me’, but this may be the standard for the entire production design.

There are 5 stickers per pack and if I am honest I think I was unlucky and got a poor selection but have to assume there are much nicer ones in the collection overall.
I got the following in the packet I bought:

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7: The right hand side of a, presumably, two part landscape. Mountains in the distance and a barren uneven rock covered landscape in the foreground with a few sparse leafless trees populating it.
62: An oval sticker of Olaf looking happy with an ice palace like staircase behind him. The outer part of the sticker can also be used so you get a more complete image of Olaf if using it alone. (You can just about see the edge of the oval in the photo).

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98: The left side of a, presumably, two part landscape image. Elsa riding on the back of Sven both with determined looks on their faces and a generic snowflake background. (Is it just me or does it look a bit ugly? A much more amateurish generic looking effort than the painted style of the other images).
116: The right side of a, presumably, two part image. A young reindeer, it’s eyes closed and its snout cut off as part of the left side of this image, tied to a green sled with a foot poking in from the left on a snowy landscape. It is probably Kristoff and a young Sven but that is just a guess.

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123: The bottom right corner of a, presumably, four part image. Three young trolls look up in adoration at the back of a man’s legs – probably Kristoff.

Did you notice the trend there? Only one sticker really stood on its own (Olaf obviously) while with the others you can see there might be an interesting image, once completed, but due to the cuts you don’t feel you got something which is satisfying in and of itself (Maybe the mountain landscape might be acceptable in fairness if you trim off the incomplete border frame). As I said maybe I was unlucky and there are plenty of standalone stickers in this series but I get the impression they went overboard with dividing images amongst multiple parts.

The quality of the stickers is good, they’re 22mm by 38mm in size and I am sure children who have the sticker album (sold for £2.99 with a few sticker packets included with it) will be happy to add these to their collection.
However I do hope that the company didn’t go overboard with multiple part imagery in the collection as having only part of a complete image is, from my memories collecting such things when little, immensely frustrating to the point you suspected they don’t include certain stickers in random sticker packs just so you pay the much higher price to directly order the remaining stickers to complete your collection rather than take the increasing risk of duplicates in the randomised sticker packets.

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So my advice… If you intend to collect the album these are okay but I would have preferred a few more stickers in the the pack as only five seems unacceptable for the price unless you were getting a lot of foil, hologram or other high cost to manufacture ‘special’ stickers in the collection thus averaging the manufacture’s cost across the collection.

As you can tell from the images these have all clearly been printed in a centralised location and given multiligual labelling in each box to make manufacturing and international distribution cheaper so I think they could have cut the price down a little more considering everything or provided more stickers. Certainly 5 per pack is the lowest number I have ever encountered!

These are new images so while you won’t be repeating the now ubiquitous imagery of every promotion since the original film’s debut it is hard to say buying just a packet of these will satisfy a fan of the property – especially younger ones expecting clear images of the heroines. It is hard to recommend them but hopefully you have better luck than me in what stickers you get. I think I was extraordinarily lucky during the previous collection of ‘Winter Fever’ I covered in a previous post but this time got a load of duds unless I intended to collect the series further.

Two Sentence Horror Stories

I begin tucking him into bed and he tells me, ‘Daddy check for monsters under my bed’. I look underneath for his amusement and see him, another him, under the bed, staring back at me quivering and whispering, ‘Daddy theres somebody on my bed’.

justAnotherMuffledVo


My daughter wont stop crying and screaming in the middle of the night. I visit her grave and ask her to stop, but it doesnt help.

skuppy


After working a hard day I came home to see my girlfriend cradling our child. I didnt know which was more frightening, seeing my dead girlfriend and stillborn child, or knowing that someone broke into my apartment to place them there.

cobaltcollapse


The last thing I saw was my alarm clock flashing 12:07 before she pushed her long rotting nails through my chest, her other hand muffling my screams.

I sat bolt upright, relieved it was only a dream, but as I saw my alarm clock read 12:06, I heard my closet door creak open.

jmperson


The doctors told the amputee he might experience a phantom limb from time to time. Nobody prepared him for the moments though, when he felt cold fingers brush across his phantom hand.

Gagege


The heart attack came and went, knocking Mike into unconsciousness, and as he awoke he could hear the graveside service around him. Somehow the casket was translucent to him and he recognized some of his friends, but his body would not move and he realized with terror what death really was.

rolypolyman


You hear your mom calling you into the kitchen. As you are heading down the stairs you hear a whisper from the closet saying ‘Dont go down there honey, I heard it too’.

comparativelysane


It sat on my shelf, with thoughtless porcelain eyes and the prettiest pink doll dress I could find. Why did she have to be born still?

Horseseverywhere


You get home, tired after a long days work and ready for a relaxing night alone. You reach for the light switch, but another hand is already there.


I kiss my wife and daughter goodnight before I go to sleep. When I wake up, Im in a padded room and the nurses tell me it was just a dream.

StoryTellerBob


Dont be scared of the monsters, just look for them. Look to your left, to your right, under your bed, behind your dresser, in your closet but never look up, she hates being seen.

AnarchistWaffles


I wish I could remember whose these people are. They tell me I have Alzheimers.

Nezzatic


You mutter the words ‘hey dad’ as you recognize the familiar figure of your father in the reflection of your laptop screen. A personalized ringing signifies a text from your dad, it reads: ‘tell mom I’ll be home late’.

meigues


The grinning face stared at me from the darkness beyond my bedroom window. I live on the 14th floor.

bentreflection


I can’t move, breathe, speak or hear and its so dark all the time. If I knew it would be this lonely, I would have been cremated instead.

Graboid27


Neatly laid across my dining room table, I found a dull kitchen knife, a torn, crusty rag, and a Flip video camera which seemed to be recording. I own none of these items.

NuclearPink


Attending his funeral today was really scary. It might have been the constant muffled screams I heard or the worry of someone noticing the dirt on my hands.


The last man on Earth sat alone in a room. There was a knock at the door.

Fredrick Brown


To the woman who keeps pounding on my door at night. Im not letting you out.

Pizzaface4372


The doctors discussed pulling the plug today. Why don’t they hear my screaming?

BrewDoctor


As I sat staring into the mirror, all I could think was that my face didn’t look right. Honestly, this man’s skin doesnt fit well at all.

Teklogikal


The monsters closed their eyes. And not a single star in the sky was seen that night.

Lithiuminus


The egotistical tyrant convinced them all that he was all-powerful, and they accepted it on faith without question, blindly; they had no choice. All except one named Lucifer.

jasammele


It’s a weird feeling, staring at your own grave. but it’s even weirder when you dig it up and see what lies there.

Pacosheo


“I woke up to hear knocking on glass. At first, I thought it was the window…until I heard it come from the mirror again.”


“I just saw my reflection blink.”


“You start to drift off into a comfortable sleep when you hear your name being whispered. You live alone.”


“There was a picture in my phone of me sleeping. I live alone.”


“In all of the time that I’ve lived alone in this house, I swear to God I’ve closed more doors than I’ve opened.”


“They celebrated the first successful cryogenic freezing. He had no way of letting them know he was still conscious.”


“I always thought my cat had a staring problem. She always seemed fixated on my face. Until one day, when I realized that she was always looking just behind me.”


“My sister says that mommy killed her. Mommy says that I don’t have a sister.”


“I never go to sleep. But I keep waking up.”


“The funeral attendees never came out of the catacombs. Something locked the crypt door from the inside.”


“My wife woke me up last night to tell me there was an intruder in our house. She was murdered by an intruder 2 years ago.


“Working the night shift alone tonight. There is a face in the cellar staring at the security camera.”


”I can’t sleep,” she whispered, crawling into bed with me. I woke up cold, clutching the dress she was buried in.


“While lying in bed trying to go to sleep, I heard my dog scratching my bedroom door. As I got up to let her in, I found her sleeping at the side of the bed.”