The Living and the Dead Episode 5

BBC Description: “When the village is engulfed by murderous spirits, Nathan and Charlotte must fight to put an end to these terrifying events.”



Credits:
Nathan Appleby: Colin Morgan
Charlotte Appleby: Charlotte Spencer
Matthew Denning: Nicholas Woodeson
Gwen Pearce: Kerrie Hayes
Gideon Langtree: Malcolm Storry
Maud Hare: Elizabeth Berrington
Harriet Denning: Tallulah Haddon
Lara: Chloe Pirrie
Smith: Harry Peacock
Lizzie Merrifield: Sarah Counsell
Simon Merrifield: Ben Fox
Mary Denning: Marianne Oldham
Writer: Peter McKenna
Producer: Eliza Mellor
Director: Sam Donovan


Victim of the episode: Everyone really as it is the ‘third act’ of the series. Nathan via Gabriel, Maud via hysteria, Harriet being used by Nathan, reverend Denning through failure to perform the exorcism successfully (and thus a loss of faith possibly?), Charlotte being emotionally shut out by her husband and in turn shutting him out harshly in return when he breaks down. The community being flooded by ghosts.


Synopsis:
It’s night-time and Charlotte is wandering the house as there’s banging coming from a room. It’s Nathan opening a crate. ‘It was meant to be a surprise’ he announces. She opens the crate with little effort in comparison to his loud attempt that brought her here. Inside is a crib for their baby. They have a moment together.

Outside and an empty swing sways in the breeze. Gwen is having it off again in the bracken and plays kiss chase but the guy lets out a hideous scream. Nathan walks out the house demanding someone show themselves. It’s a misty night filled with the screams of the damned. DUN DUN DURR

A voiceover talks of the massacre during the Civil War when the Roundheads massacred people in the town. Children run through the town with sacks on their heads around a scarecrow with a noose around its neck, crows caw, Gideon the foreman sacrifices/kills a pig. Peters mother Maud says that Gwen’s ‘bit on the side’ saw a disemboweled woman hanging from the tree. She thinks it’s an omen. It can’t be believed as ‘railway lads are townies’. Gideon doesn’t believe it himself.

Nathan and Payne walk through a work site and he asks where he saw something but Payne doesn’t want to recount it. He thinks something is wrong here and doesn’t like the place. The work for the aqueduct is stopped as they need to find new workers willing to come here. (The village is a ghost town which is probably meant as a bit of dramatic irony considering what is about to happen). Charlotte says damn them and the railway. He feels any time they make progress something happens. Nathan thinks something is going on but Charlotte is more dismissive only accepting what she sees and nothing more. She wants them to focus on the farm and the future. GET IT? SHE IS MORE AND MORE BECOMING THE LEVEL HEADED ONE NOW WHILE HE IS GIVING INTO THE ‘MAGICAL’ SIDE OF THINGS.

Gwen routes around the library and finds the dead son’s picture and the Ouija board but quickly hides it before the Applbys’ return. (They are depicting her being shifty but there is no pay off later as she seems to be set up as a red herring).

Charlotte is photoing the costumed townsfolk and children. Nathan is at the swing in the forest looking for evidence. He finds runes carved on a tree trunk. He sees the modern-day red coat woman in the distance and runs towards her but she disappears behind a tree. Charlotte sees him in the distance and he sees the woman in red in the distance crossing a field. He says he is alright when she seems concerned. Charlotte photos the masked children and villagers with only Nathan remaining unmasked. They remain still for a few seconds and then Charlotte says they’re all done.

Nathan hears a baby in the house as he ascends the stairs. He sees the red coat woman run from one room to another. When he gets into the room all he sees is the crib stood in the middle of the empty room’s floor.

Reverend’s daughter Harriet , wearing a cloak and hood, walks through the town seeing the traditional pagan like festivities around her. Nathan rides up on a horse and says he needs her help. She says she is expected at home. He insists its important and needs their attention this evening. He is very insistent.

He uses pig’s blood to draw on the wall as Harriet watches and he asks if she remembers how they did it before. He intends to hypnotise her. Does the ‘focus on the watch and let all else fade away’ routine as common for portrayals of hypnotism of that era.

Maud Hare walks out her door and hears screaming in the distance. (Did her son Peter die? I honestly forgot the end of that episode by apparently he did).

Nathan wants the now hypnotised Harriet to tell the red coat woman he has seen her and ask her what she wants. She seems to just be unconscious but suddenly, as a minor jump scare, speaks in a raspy voice saying they’re coming for you just as he was about to wake her. That is all he gets. Cryptic.

A loaded cart goes down the road as more workers leave the village.

Mrs Hare complains of it to the Foreman. The butcher’s wife is wanting through the stores and hears noises. Creaking, rats, all that. Blood drips on some dusty vases.

In the pub the foreman supports the Appleby’s but Mrs Hare says maybe the workers had the right idea as they can all see whats happening. He asks where would they go? Somewhere new where they’re not living side by side with evil.

Charlotte calls for Gwen. She sees the drawing on the wall. It was done in pig’s blood. ‘Nothing good comes from inviting the dead back into your life’ she says.

Denning and his wife are in the living room. Harriet comes back home. Harriet explains Mr Appleby her tardiness but doesn’t explain the details.

Charlotte scolds her husband for involving the girl. He says about seeing the red coat woman and how if she saw what he saw she would believe. he describes how the woman has pictures which move as if alive and knows the names of Peter Hare and others.

Denning shouts about involving his daughter in these matters and says to not involve her in their misadventures. In the distance they see a fire has been set alight. They go to explore. The Denning says not to bother as itll burn out by the time they get their. So Nathan resolves to go look in the morning.

We see him stood under the charred tree the next morning as Denning arrives ‘to satisfy his own curiosity’. Theres not signs of a burning but Nathan is certain. Denning is annoyed by Nathan saying ‘I believe in God and man and very little in between’. They haven’t found the remains – yet.

Charlotte processes her photos. She notes in the background of one a boy holding a wooden toy boat who wasnt there before. Gwen distracts her regarding food being ready. She seems dismayed as if her husband perhaps has a point.

Nathan explains about the red coat woman ghost to Denning who is irritated by Nathan. He is sure she is orchestrating it all. He thinks it will escalate unless they do an exorcism. Denning refutes it saying exorcisms are only for the most extraordinary cases. He refuses. Nathan is insistent.

Walking down a path with a horse and cart Charlotte asks Gwen if she believes in ghosts. Gwen says she’s not certain she believes in ghosts but there is ‘more than just man and beast’. They talk of spirits lingering.

Mrs Hare, working the fields reveals she has marks around her neck she is covering. Foreman hears the screaming voices. The workers run towards Charlotte calling out about soldiers and spirits and such. Through the mists she sees Roundhead soldiers on horseback rush past the. No one is sure whats going on. Mrs Hare runs off. It’s all Hallow’s Eve. She recounts that this is when the Roundheads committed the massacre then calls on everyone to run away as far as they can.

Nathan asks the pig blood drawing to tell him what it wants. As he goes to empty the bucket he sees the red coat woman run up and tell him to stop. The blood spills across the floor.

Denning talks to his wife in the church and Harriet enters. He is a skeptic regarding the occult but he doesn’t know what to make of this. Someone bangs on the doors so he goes to look but when he opens it no one is to be seen. Harriet feels something choking her as she claws at her throat. When her parents come back they see her levitating as if being hung. They run beneath her to support her. The wife keeps shouting she is choking. Her father runs for baptismal water and ‘in the father, and the holy ghost’ exorcises her. She descends and her tells them to go wait at home as he has to go do something.

At Nathan’s house he agrees to do the exorcism. Charlotte rushes in and speaks of the events in the woods. Nathan seems overjoyed everyone is seeing what he has been seeing. The workers are outside. He tells them to go home as Reverend Denning will perform a ceremony to get rid of this darkness.

Charlotte asks Denning if he believes this is all the work of ghosts and the dead. He says he knows he has “… seen terrible and unexplainable things and whatever hand is behind them must be stopped.”

She asks if he can banish only the evil spirits and not the benign. ‘I have no room for such distinctions. All that is present must be cast out’. Charlotte recalls the boy. ‘it is imperative if Shepscoy is to have any peace’.

People run down the road and crowd into the pub.

Denning does the holy rites at the Appleby house – its depicted like a major moment. Gwen also watches. Candles flutter out. Doors close by themselves. Shadows scuttle by. Nathan believes its working. Then the gramophone with Gabriel’s voice starts up. Denning says to ignore it. It’s not his son; the devil takes on many forms. Nathan cannot resist but to listen. The voice mentions playing with his boat. The wet boat boy was their dead son… of course as he drowned. Charlotte shows Nathan the photo. HEnce why she asked about benign spirits being also cast out. Nathan is angry she knew but didn’t show him the photo, NAthan goes to stop Denning. Denning says the boy’s soul is with God and chastises him trying to stop the exorcism. Nathan forces him out of the house. He goes as far as telling Denning he will take his gun to him if he doesn’t leave. Resigned Denning leaves.

Mrs Hare leaves her house under cover of night.

Charlotte hears the banging outside return and scolds her husband that Gabriel is dead. ‘He is still my son’ Nathan replies while looking at photos of him.

The people in the pub’s basement are scared.

Denning hears screams and sees blood dripping into a puddle. Mrs Hare runs through the forest. Denning calls out to no avail. Mrs Hare falls over and sees her hand covered in blood. She turns and sees a hung man. Elsewhere Denning sees the same above him. Terrified Mrs Hare runs into a fork in a tree and presumably breaks her own neck with the force. Dennings screams out seeing the trail lined with hanging bodies. We cut back to Mrs Hare and somehow she laughed herself onto the fork in the tree and is unable to work herself free from it as she is suspended off the ground. She soon succumbs and dies. Denning, holding up his lamp, sees the path no longer has the bodies.

Foreman announces to the people ‘they’re gone’. Denning meanwhile breaks down into sobs.

The next morning people g through the forest looking for Maud Hare finding her shawl and such along the way. He found her suspended body in the tree.

Nathan is writing in his journal saying he feels his sons ghost all around him. Charlotte with the workers calls out and says they found Maud’s body. THey thought he was going to get rid of this. He tells I decided not to proceed with the ceremony’. Why the foreman asks. ‘I had good reasons. Very important ones.’ He hears Gabriel’s voice singing from the house. He runs back inside and demand ‘give back my son’. Charlotte rushes in after him shouting ‘you do realise none of them will work for us again?’ but he is too preoccupied. He shows her the photo which she tries to grab and rip up while shouting ‘I just want him to leave us alone’. but Nathan unintentionally strikes her while trying to get the photo back. She of course is shocked, she draws back and there’s blood on her lip. It’s probably not ironic that this episode she has had a red blouse on and he seems to be wearing what would be modern clothing. He reaches to her but she shouts ‘No!’ and runs away. We see the pig blood drawing and Gwen approaching the bloody rag she affixes to the tree in episode one which by now is dirty.

Charlotte takes out a negative of her husband in a field. it’s the photo she took at the start of episode one. Next we see Gwen is in a coat and hat in the kitchen. Has she seen Nathan. Gwen says no and advises she and the baby leave for their own safety. She even offers to go with them so she isn’t alone. Charlotte says she can’t leave her husband. Gwen says she wont abandon her. This would be a nice scene if it wasn’t for the fact they seem to be hinting Gwen is out-of-place here and probably a witch and thus involved in the events. (Spoiler: They kind of abandon all this hinting and she is a benign, if over subserviant, red herring figure).

We cut to a scene of Nathan playing with the toy boat by the lake sending it out onto the water. The water ripples and the episode ends.



Review:
A penultimate episode and all that you would expect it to entail. It was Denning’s big moment to be honest and if they had filmed it a bit differently or had more intense music it would have improved the scene. I’m not sure if they perhaps made Nathan a bit too… not unlikable but definitely not amicable… a character right from the start so when we see this unravelling of him it isn’t as big a shock. I mean that is also an issue of ‘boxset’ releasing this show. I am watching the last two episodes on a separate day as it felt like this was going to be the real meat of the series with everything leading up to it but honestly right now I feel like with some good editing you could knock this series down to 2 maybe 3 hours by omitting the mining boys of episode two and cutting down the other episodes.

Gabriel, though it is never stated explicitly, is Nathan’s son from a previous relationship – in fact I was even go as far as to assume marriage. At some point I feel a scene wa omitted indicating these facts but the series likes to tease it. If this was the case I would think that from the very start Charlotte, although clearly enamoured with her husband, would have behaved slightly differently when arriving to this town and all its reminders of his son. It seems she is aware of Gabriel’s history but she never refers to him as Nathan’s son – that is to say that of the pairing of the Applebys on Nathan has a connection to the boy.

This dancing around a few facts seems a vain attempt at maintaining a mystery which need not exist. If anything the revelation she is not his first wife would give the audience more questions to answer but it honestly feels like they are stringing it out as if they already knew they would have a second season commissioned even before filming began. It’s pointless and the efforts to hide it end up deterring much-needed time for developing the narrative they are telling right now. Either make it an outright mystery resolved in the final episode or don’t waste the audiences time acting as if we need to piece together minor plot points. Again this series seems to feel smarter than it is and wants to impress that upon an audeince it seems to be speaking down to.

Charlotte’s character development is very pessimistic in tone. I have to wonder if there was a member of staff supervising the continuity of the series as we have a scene early on where Charlotte notes the dark side of Nathan’s personality and vows to be there for him to keep it from consuming him but when that time comes she confides in Gwen who I keep feeling is being kept in the background to be the cause of distrust and such now she has Charlotte’s confidence but this never comes to fruition. She just seems to be a poorly implemented red herring in a show that hasn’t developed her that way save for her being a hedge witch (thus representing the ‘dark’ faith opposition to the ‘light’ version of reverend Denning and both in contrast to the logical science views represented by the Appleby couple.

Again the writers are showing a very pessimistic view of their character’s humanity towards each other under the guise of a Victorian ghost story series. What they did with Life on Mars and Ashes to Ashes wherein they created a sort of hyperstylised version of the 1970s and 1980s eras of policing on television respectively doesn’t carry over here. You can see the influences to those series but here it seems they have taken a very broad concept, Victorian ghost stories, and done little to educate themselves about how to deconstruct it as they did with their previous works. Instead we get very heavyhanded commentary which often feels misguided or ill-informed.

What was a rather lack lustre, narratively ponderous, series becomes offensive in its depiction of mental health through symbolism of being haunting by the past.

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The Living and the Dead: Episode 4

Episode 4: “When a woman goes missing, Nathan must put his spiritual troubles aside to lead the rescue party. As he races to solve the mystery, Charlotte struggles with a secret of her own.”



Credits:
Nathan Appleby: Colin Morgan
Charlotte Appleby: Charlotte Spencer
Matthew Denning: Nicholas Woodeson
Gwen Pearce: Kerrie Hayes
Martha Enderby: Fiona O’Shaughnessy
Jack Langtree: Joel Gilman
Gideon Langtree: Malcolm Storry
Isiah Cobb: Adam Ewan
Alice Wharton: Gina Bramhill
William Payne: David Oakes
Maud Hare: Elizabeth Berrington
Lizzie Merrifield: Sarah Counsell
Lara: Chloe Pirrie
Writer: Robert Murphy
Producer: Eliza Mellor
Director: Sam Donovan


Victim of the episode:
Martha for being ‘different’. Jack for being a lovesick fool and because the creators believe the audience want karmic retribution making him pay for the previous episode. Alice the ghost girl who fell to her death or committed suicide while hysterical.


Synopsis:
Autumn 1894 – A woman in a red dress moves through a forest as if being chased. Nathan, in his office, uses a Ouija board to call on Clarity Winlove as he still wants to know if she blessed or cursed Charlotte’s womb. The red dress woman calls out asking if someone is there. Scene duality for the win yo. Nathan is getting no results himself though. The woman gets captured suddenly. Charlotte is back from her apple foraging calls on him. Once he is gone the Ouiji board begins to move. and ‘Daddy’ is written on the mirror. DUN DUN DURR.

The hay wagon has been tampered with leaving the sacks spilt on the ground. Reverend Denning came to check on Nathan and notes the Ouija board on his desk. They discuss the fashion for spiritualism which he sees as a malaise and covering the grief of bereavement. Nathan asks him his view as his reverend. Transgressing against man and nature. Jack Langtree is suspected of being the saboteur.

Miss Martha Enderby, the red dressed woman, appears and is the school marm we are told. If you have been watching can you honestly say you say the actress in any of the community gathering scenes in the past episodes? I can’t personally. She is clearly in shock so Nathan offers her a stiff drink and Denning asks her if she remembered anything. She remembers nothing of course as she is still in shock. She speculates maybe if she got back there… then remembers Jack Langtree attacked her… but it also wasn’t him at the same time. Almost as if he were possessed.

Later Nathan speculates she is blocking out something traumatic and wants to take her back into the forest in order to go after Jack. Charlotte protests but Martha agrees as ‘Jack Langtree is dangerous’.

Nathan asks if Jack forced himself on her which seems a logical enquiry considering her behaviour. They then look for where Jack attacked her.

Charlotte goes looking around the silent house and hears a baby’s cry. She then vomits in a bowl as Gwen turns up. Pregnant marm? Pregnant marm… Let Gwen hold your hair there marm while you chunder marm…

Nathan asks Martha to recall things and Martha speaks of a girl Alice she was educating. ( For those who remember the song: all together now! ‘Alice? Alice? Who the F*** is Alice?’) Jack was living and poaching there. Alice was going to elope with him so Martha was hoping to warn her off. (she has split personality and the grabbing at the start was of lovers i bet). she challenges him saying people think Nathan is raising the dead but she thinks he is a good man. They see smoke coming from nearby.

Gwen makes a drink to stop Charlotte vomiting. Chalotte wonders whats in it and Gwen says ‘what you don’t know wont hurt you’. HEDGE WITCH COMING TO THE RESCUE. Charlotte reflects on matters again and ‘hope is better than no hope’. She asks Gwen about he sound of the baby asking if maybe a worker brough a baby in. Gwen says she doesn’t know. ITS FORESHADOWING. NATHAN ISN’T THE ONLY ONE GETTING GHOST ENCOUNTERS… but later in the series she refuses to believe him which in hindsight makes it seem like a severe plot contrivance considering what happened here.

Nathan and Martha find a still smouldering camp site by the mouth of a cave. Nathan calls for Jack but there is no response so he goes to investigate. Martha sees it as Alice’s room and asks what he’s done to her? She runs for air looking around the upper levels of the trees when a pale, blonde, ghost girl appears nearby whom she identifies as Alice. Nathan goes to approach her but Martha shouts ‘No!’. (She’s a ghost then I guess.) Martha wants to leave this place. Nathan points her in the direction of his house and tells her to inform his wife. Martha says Alice isn’t the secret flower of the forest. No because that’s an unsubtle metaphor for the vagina… because you know… lesbianism symbolism. Nathan tells her he will bring her home safely.

Charlotte rides a horse to Mr Payne’s stately looking home. He is handsome. He has llamas. You know at some point he is going to be involved in some sort of temptation storyline with Charlotte as the, at the moment, happily married woman. They have banter but she is here to ask a favour. She needs his wagons. He agrees to it. (I bet he sabotaged them).

Nathan is still chasing Alice though the woods. He comes to a narrow path between tall rocks and finds Alice collapsed there… turning her over he sees she is a corpse. DUN DUN DURR!

Charlotte arrives home on her horse but seems weary of something. She enters and calls for Gwen. (Gwen’s been hiding a baby unless DUN DUN DURR its foreshadowing about the modern-day matters being hinted at heavily). Martha is sat in front of the fire. She considers it ‘all her fault’. Alice was going to elope with Jack and she lost her temper and went too far. When she went back to apologise Alice was gone. Believes she would have overcome her infatuation with Jack if she hadn’t intervened. Nathan checks the corpse and sees blood on the nearby moss. As Martha tells Charlotte more of Alice Nathan brings the corpse back through the forest.

Jack is wandering through the forest himself looking remorseful for how things have turned out.

Charlotte believes people wouldn’t accept a friendship between a school teacher and a simple lady. she views the area as backwards, even medieval, then apologises for saying such. MORE OF THE MAIN CHARACTERS BIGOTTRY. LETS HOPE THERE ARE NO EPISODES ON THE HORIZON WHERE WE ARE MEANT TO BE SYMPATHETIC. In reality, is such a small community, they would have. Oh except maybe this was the creator’s attempt at using ‘friendship’ as a euphemism for lesbianism – in which case I think you would find even modern urban societies would also at that time not look favourably towards their ‘friendship’. This is some bad writing.

Mr Payne arrives so Charlotte goes to greet him. Nathan arrives with the corpse of Alice. Like a cat that’s gone hunting. Alice was one of Mr Payne’s workers. Nathan asks for his help to apprehend Jack Langtree to which he agrees. Martha uncovers the body and sees the corpse of her friend. She and Nathan look at each other and he has Gwen take Martha back in the house. Charlotte questions him but Nathan asks she do as he asks. Be a good wife – love, honour and obey – just like you were so sycophantically willing to do in the first two episodes.

He inspects Alice’s corpse in a candle lit room while making written notes playing at being a proto-forensic investigator. Martha is staying with them and is shocked by the appearance of Alice’s ghost in the window.
Nathan later that evening declares to Martha and Charlotte he believes Alice was murdered that morning and discusses seeing her spirit. Martha denies seeing the ghost of Alice earlier suggesting he imagined it when he was there with her. He grabs her arm aggressively and asks what she is playing at then begins to shout at her claiming she is lying. Charlotte gets between them and apologizes for his behaviour. HIS FAITH IN SCIENCE IS BEING SHAKEN AND IT ONLY TOOK 4 SEPERATE GHOST ENCOUNTERS.

Nathan and Charlotte go into the corridor and she believes he has been in his study too long. Then the title of the series comes up as he is focused on the dead and she wants him to focus on the living. DRAMATIC DENOUEMENT – PLAY THE THEME TUNE!!! He then tells her about seeing the healer Miss Winlove’s ghost and needing to know if it was a blessing or a curse placed on Charlotte. She says she has given him everything she has but he has abandoned her.

He hears tinny voices and goes rushing to his study. He sees an electronic tablet speaking but it disappears and he doesn’t know what to make of it. I should note now they clearly indicate it is an iPad in a later episode by name in case you thought the BBC never do product placement. That is a hell of a strong back light on it considering how it lights things up.

The next morning he rushes outside to his horse as Charlotte comes outside to see him riding into the distance. Martha, inside, hears noises coming from an adjoining room to her’s. The door handle rattles. She opens the door and see the silhouette of Alice which then comes screaming towards her in a very goofy way. FORESHADOWING.

Cut to reverend Denning giving a sermon and children placing harvest festival offerings in a pile at the altar. TRAILER SHOT.

Jack is hiding under a tree from the mob hunting him down with rifles in hand. TRAILER SHOT. They find him and he runs away from them. Payne and a few of his workers arrive brandishing rifles. Payne spots Jack running in the distance and raises his weapon. However Nathan catches Payne just in time and calls him out on his conduct. Payne claims he wasn’t going to kill him and Nathan says he wants Jack alive. OH IS PAYNE BEING HEAVYHANDEDLY MARKED OUT AS AN ANTAGONIST? I THINK SO!

Gwen lock and loads a rifle saying if Jack Langtree comes their way he’ll have her to deal with. She also locked Martha’s door when Charlotte asks where Miss Enderby is.

Nathan chases Jack. Others appear with rifles. Nathan catches up to him. Jack thinks its Nathan causing the curse and persecuting him for all his ills. He considered Alice his angel who was going to save him. Nathan tells Jack he wants him to return for a fair hearing. Jack just wants him to bring her back. He’s seen him raise the dead and asked him to do it again. Nathan says he is ‘just a man, no more, no more’. So Jack throws himself off those same high stones that Alice did and dies.

Charlotte wants entry to Martha’s room but she just wants to be alone.

Payne asks if he wasnt guilty of murder why did he run? Nathan finds a book on Jack.

Charlotte moves a table from barricading the door. Chalotte tells her she believes Nathan saw something and asks why Martha lied and denied seeing it.

Nathan reads the book and Martha also recites the lines. ‘my love is like a red red rose… until the seas run dry. To my secret flower of the forest, love Martha’.

GET IT? SHE WAS A LESBIAN ALL ALONG! JACK LOVED ALICE. ALICE LOVED JACK. MARTHA LOVED ALICE BUT ALICE WASN’T A LESBIAN! MARTHA WAS AN OBSESSIVE LESBIAN STALKER, WHOSE LOVE WASN’T RECIPROCATED, ALL ALONG! WOOOOOOOOOOOO SPOOKY! SPINE TINGLING HORROR! HOPE YOU CAN SLEEP TONIGHT!

Jack loved Alice as did Martha. Martha always felt alone until she realised she loved Alice with all her heart. Then she sees the ghost of Alice saying if she loved her she wouldn’t have done this to her.

Nathan runs home as Martha monologues about how she was ignored because she was different. She then begins to choke Charlotte claiming to love her (Alice) challenging her why she laughed at her. She is delusional. Charlotte is choking. Nathan arrives and runs up the stairs. Gwen has already shot Martha dead and remains stood over the corpse pointing the rifle at it. Where was she earlier? We always see her literally at Charlotte’s right hand so it seems a plot contrivance she was absent without reason in order for Charlotte to get in trouble.

Field workers carry Jack’s body out for burial as the others ask where it will end as another of them is dead and he replies he doesn’t know.

Denning, in the church, approaches the altar and sees all the harvest offerings have gone mouldy and rotten. DUN DUN DURR (Actually this is a good bit of foreshadowing for the next episode in fairness).

Police take Martha away in a horse and carriage. How genteel for an attempted murder. Payne also departs after being thanked for playing his part. Nathan goes back inside to Charlotte. Martha murdered Alice with no possession or demon. It was because of passion and folly he claims. Human weakness. Charlotte says she can not remain here. She tried to kill her. He says he will protect her. He Loves her. But can he protect their child she asks. He is happy she is pregnant. It was everything they wanted and why they came here so nothing else matters but this. ‘the past is dead and the dead are dead. there is only us three’. and they embrace smiling. But we see him look pensively when she is unable to see his face.

STINGER CLIFFHANGER TIME. A modern car with the red coated woman pulls up to the house and she takes a baby asking ‘do you want to go inside?’ GET IT? THAT’S WHERE THE BABY  NOISE CHARLOTTE HEARD WAS COMING FROM.



Review:

A bit awkward of an episode. A modern audience is meant to take it as Martha was a lesbian but the problem is that women of that era had far more intimate friendships than nowadays. If you look at the story Carmilla by Sheridan Le Farnu nothing in it was lesbian in tone for the era but in contrast to today it certainly seems overly intimate but was normal at the time especially for middle or upper class young women.

Mr Payne just seems to be suddenly introduced here. I appreciate we don’t have to be shown every aspect of the Applebys’ arrival in the town in episode 1 but considering what we are shown you would think some reference to him would be made prior to the very sudden ‘we need help from someone (but someone who is equal to us not the workers who are portrayed as a sheep like rabble)’ moment in this episode.

Alice has little character development so her death seems little more than a weak narrative device. An object acted upon. What made her so appealing to Martha and Jack we never really get explained. She was inquisitive and wanted to learn. That is the motivation for protecting a youth not eloping with a lover.

So did Jack vandalise the wagons? I’m not sure if that little mystery is resolved or not.

When did Jack, or others, see Nathan raise the dead? It is mentioned a few times during the series and the only people you could argue he did that to was Peter and there were very few people present.

Really the time frame of this series seems to be about one episode per 2 months of them living there due to the passage from harvest to raining winter time imagery by the end of the series.

The image of Gwen as loyal servant is fine. People ‘knew their place’ as part of the class system. I take issue with the image of Gwen stood over Matha’s corpse though. It implies we are meant to see Gwen as badass or a strong woman in comparison to the other women this episode. What I see though is a clear glorification of violence. When did Gwen, a house based servant, learn how to use a rifle? We are never told and it neither came up before or after yet she seems to handle it like an expert. Was shooting Martha a reasonable response to seeing Charlotte being choked? Couldn’t she had instead struck her at the back of the head to knock her out (which still might seem severe but at least would leave Martha alive). No. No can’t be having any of that. Lesbians are degenerate. Might infect the other women folk. Death to her it is. So add hints of homophobia to the anti-intellectualism before. ‘Oh but that’s how people were back then’…. No. This series is presenting a very stereotyped view of the era and it seems minimal research was done concerning the issues of each episode. They are showing the worst of society each time and it makes the entire matter disagreeable in tone and execution.

The sudden turn of Charlotte from being loving , doting, wife to critical skeptic is too sharp. If they had done a better job of indicating her increasing disquiet I could accept it but it seems that the denouement before the ‘real’ story of the series begins is presented in a very heavyhanded manner making it seem forced rather than a gradual creeping development in the series. This goes even more so for how easily the workers leave the town. Many of them would have lived and worked in this community since birth so would know nothing of the next community over let alone have the drive or savings to abandon their homestead.

It’s a very heavy handedly written episode and it does a severe disservice to the story regarding Martha, Jack and Alice’s love triangle. There was potential there, especially in addressing the view of lesbianism in that era, but it is discarding in one of the most blunt ‘DRAMABOMB’ style sudden shifts in dramatic tone between its leads I have seen in recent history without it intended to be a shock. To me this is the turning point in the series where it tries to be far more clever than it is and its only downhill from here. What at first seemed like it would be an interesting series about science versus superstition – in regards to whether the ghosts are real or unclassified psychological issues – but decided melodrama is more important than consistency. If anything I feel this series is a veiled contempt for people who are not ‘normal’ under the guise of ‘oh but its set in the past and its that generations view of it’ when it often wouldn’t have been in reality. I will cover each episodes ‘people of hate’ in a round-up review in a few weeks hence why I explicitly note the ‘victims of the week’ with each entry. The series seems to want to deal with social issues but if so a lot of it’s topics are at least a decade too late.


The BBC seem to be uploading promotional images and such to the official site a few weeks behind airing the episodes on BBC1 which is annoying as I cannot post images of the episode I am reviewing in each post. Obviously they are preparing for the international market and are behind schedule. Fortunately I can return and add the appropriate image later but it is a shame for anyone who wants immediate reviews in the days following the episodes broadcast.

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The Living And The Dead Episode 3

BBC Episode 3 Description: “The farm and its future are under threat. Can Nathan and Charlotte save their crops and expose the dark secrets of a disturbed young man before he does any more damage?”



Credits
Nathan Appleby: Colin Morgan
Charlotte Appleby: Charlotte Spencer
Matthew Denning: Nicholas Woodeson
Gwen Pearce: Kerrie Hayes
Peter Hare: Robert Emms
Maud Hare: Elizabeth Berrington
Gideon Langtree: Malcolm Storry
Agnes Thatcher : Pooky Quesnel
Clarity Winlove:Katy Michael
Jack Langtree: Joel Gilman
Bathsheba Thatcher: Amber Fernee
Simon Merrifield: Ben Fox
Lizzie Merrifield: Sarah Counsell
John Roebuck: Steve Oram
Martha Enderby: Fiona O’Shaughnessy
Writer: Simon Tyrell
Producer: Eliza Mellor
Director: Alice Troughton


Victim(s) of the Episode: Peter Hare, due to persecution, and by extension his mother Maud. Clarity Winlove in the past due to similar persecution.



Synopsis

Nathan’s walking through the hay fields. The boys from last episode fade into the field, the modern-day red coat woman is flashed on-screen. Charlotte catches up to him and talks of the harvest. Banter. Backlit by the sunrise and kissing. Trailer shot accomplished.

Peter Hare dreams of being told he must make the sacrifice before waking. The voice tells him to ‘do it’ as he looms over his mother, Maud Hare, who awakes.

The workers are stood in a row awaiting Charlotte’s tasting of a single a grain and if she will declare if they’re to start the harvest today. She says tomorrow so the foreman, Gideon, tells them to all go. So she has gone from an urban house wife to knowing the intricacies of harvesting techniques which would take others a lifetime to develop? By this point she is a mary sue or as its more commonly called the protagonist of a romance novel. Or a pale shadow of Bathsheba Everdene. Your choice.

Charlie’s mother has packed up and is leaving after his death. Her three daughters sit silently on the cart. She says that he, the smart doctor, obviously knows their minds better than they do after he says it would be better for them if they stayed. She leaves in tears and the littlest girl has her doll wave and says ‘bye bye’. At least they are not ignoring that character’s have their own will but I feel there was more of a story that could have been told with them only for them to be gone now they’ve served their purpose.

The disturbed young man Peter goes for a swim. He sees a corpse and so goes and tells Nathan the ord of the manor authority figure. Nathan then himself goes for a swim to investigate. He doesn’t see the ghost/delusion. Peter, in front of Nathan, tells the voices in his head to shut up. Nathan notes maybe he needs help. Peter excuses himself and leaves as Nathan looks, bare-chested, into the distance. For the ladies. We get it – you’re marketing this towards a female audience you don’t need to be so heavy-handed about it.

Later all the fish in the lake/pond are dead so Nathan and Charlotte go back inside. She has her photo equipment and they talk of the mill’s history. Then he gets all soppy over a dandelion seed floating on his hand. Then as she sets her equipment up they make out.

The workers are down the pub complaining they’ll not be paid until next week and don’t like it. The reverend Denning sticks up for the Applebys toasting ‘the new and the old’. GET IT NEW AND OLD/LIVING AND DEAD/GABRIEL AND (SPOILER). Nathan visits the Peter’s mother Maude. Maude says the school master said he could go to university on a bursary but she thought it ‘better he learn a trade’. Nathan reckons Peter poisoned the mill pond. Nice leaping to conclusions with no evidence there Mr Protagonist. Then makes comments that he’s sure his, and his wife’s minds are fine… Peter says he’s glad it’s only dead fish and not dead people Nathan sees. FORESHADOWING. Charlotte develops her photos as Nathan bursts into her room. She sees a woman in her photograph but blames the bromide process having inadequacies.

They’re unlikable protagonists really as they seem so apathetic. They boss people around and stick their nose into things that are not their concern. But whatever – they own the land and by extension the people who work it in accord with feudalism traditions it seems. Are they landowners then to the level people pay rent and taxes to them?

Peter is told by the voices in his head to sacrifice his mother’s blood or else the harvest will fail. Very old school pagan view there. Wonder if they’ll indicate where he got these beliefs from as either way he had to have learnt it from somewhere as it is quite an old testament kind of idea.

Nathan is in his study at night and sees bugs on his copy book thus foreshadowing the next day’s events.

Next morning and Peter crosses paths with the Gideon, the foreman, who is suspicious of what he is doing up at that time of day.

Nathan has been up all night and written nothing. Black devil insects destroyed the harvest just as they did back in ’62. Foreman Gideon says Peter cursed the harvest. Again blaming him without proof. Wife declares they have an infestation and it’s not a curse nor are they devils. I’m quite sure the workers didn’t literally think they were devils. (Again it makes me less sympathetic to the character before the big conflict later in the series… ) So she says they’ll harvest the insects one by one then harvest the wheat. No magical answers here, just hard graft.

Peter says he hears voices. The woman under the water. What she told him about the sacrifice. Nathan says he doesn’t have to do that but doesn’t stop him either when he runs off and gets a sickle!?

Charlotte reads her farming books, instead of consult with at least Gideon about what to do, to see if there isn’t an answer and gets frustrated.

Nathan asks boy’s mother and she doesn’t remember it as she’s too young. She refutes it when Nathan said her son will become aggressive. He tells her to lock her bedroom door. He knows what will happen but lets her walk off!?

Charlotte creates a wonder solution ‘with science’! She is going to set some flammable incense off and needlessly tells the workers to ‘beware the crops catching fire’. You mean the workers who are not setting something on fire in the middle of the field and have been toiling away? She tells the workers to plant the others. I get the impression this stuff is actually similar to DDT and more hazardous than just accepting the crop failed.

Peter meets that actor Jack Langtree who reminds me of that actor who always plays west country rural workers. Clearly Peter has been like this before. The foreman Gideon, who it also passes is Jack’s uncle, says ‘the mistress has broken the spell so lets not have anymore of this okay’ to Peter still apparently believing he had a hand in the failed crops. Then Jack doused Peter in water ‘like a drowned rat’. So Peter is persecuted then by the others still.

The harvest is finished and Nathan asks Peter how he is then talks of insects ‘crawling into our minds’. Nice. Subtle. Not likely to spark him off whatsoever. Psychology 101 qualification don’t forget. Invites Peter to the Appleby house and hows him a photo of his mother as a child and Peter notices the lake woman in the photo. She was a healer who disappeared in the village. Charlotte asks if he is concerned about Peter but Nathan says ‘you can never be sure of what people are capable of’. Nice bit of prejudice there then, Peter is a worker with capabilities above his station being born intelligent and needs to be put back in his place and made to conform via persecution. No wonder he is so screwed up from living in this community. The writers might have had a point but by allowing Nathan to make such comments it makes him complicit and a far less sympathetic figure. (Again in the lead up to the part of the series where we are expected to be sympathetic to him).

Then at night Nathan sees the ghost woman as Charlotte lying next to him awakes and realises the harvest will be ruined by the sudden storm. He seems rattled by his experience just now. People toil in the field under the heavy rainfall. There’s some ominous Enya style music. ‘the devil wants to drown us all’. Peter has the voice tell him to do the sacrifice so they don’t blame him for the rain. His mother, Maude, had locked her door heeding Nathan’s advice from earlier. They discuss Clarity Winlove a.k.a. the drowned ghost woman. Maude denies knowing her. She adds terrified that though he might not love her she loves him. Peter calls her a liar and walks away.

Charlotte tells everyone to go home to rest and pray for better weather. Bossy boots Bathesheba wannabe. Jack and Gideon talk. Jack wants to end it ‘the old way’ but the Gideon is unsure. IS IT A DROWNING? IT’S A DROWNING ISN’T IT?

Nathan considers the events just a case of bad luck. They saved a quarter of the harvest. Nathan says maybe he brought the curse with him. Maybe its her Charlotte adds. YES LETS HAVE A PITY PARTY THAT’LL MAKE US GOOD PROTAGONISTS. She lists how she wasn’t born there, brought the machine and judged the reaping wrong. He says its lunatic talk, monomaniacal, the devil. The misfortunes nothing to do with her, there is no curse. She goes to change her wet cloths. He stares at the photo of Peter’s mother as a child and the healer woman.

He asks, the following day, if Maude knows Clarity Winlove. She denies it but then says Clarity went to America to see a distant cousin. Apparently that’s the ‘official’ story. Jack came looking for Peter and Nathan realises that Jack is going to attack Peter.

Jack find Peter in the old mill. He thinks that’s where Peter does his spells and such. Peter tries to run but he captures him easily.

Peter’s mother bangs on the Applebys’ door saying its her fault not her sons.

Jack ties Peter up to drown him as the ghost tells Peter that’s what was done to her. ‘You’ll reap what you sow’ and claims Peter is a witch as he floats in the pond so weighs him down before running off. Peter’s mother finds him face down. Nathan and his wife arrive and try to pump his lungs which works. His mother immediately goes to cut her wrist as payment for what she did years ago. She drowned Clarity due to the poor harvest just as Jack was going to drown Peter. She saw a potion Clarity had given her mother to put in her father’s meal to aid fertility. She knew what Clarity was but claimed she was a witch and had the others tie her in chains and drown her. Again she goes to cut herself but Peter runs up and tells her she must forgive herself.

Nathan looks pensively at the ghost of Clarity, stood in the doorway of the mill, as the others leave for home. He calls out to her to show herself saying she sat by his wife and touched her womb. ‘Was it a blessing or was it a curse?’ he demands before leaving and going to the pub to confront Jack.

Jack Langtree thought Peter was dead but Nathan assures him he isn’t otherwise he would hang Jack for murder. Jack says there’s something wrong here as he was trying to rid them, the community, of evil. Nathan tells him to go and never return to his land as he is banished. Jack defiantly claims he was going anyway and that the place is damned, calling on the others to deny it, ever since Nathan returned.

Charlotte urinated on some flowers to see if she is pregnant. Gwen says she think she is. Charlotte doesn’t want Nathan to know until she is sure.

The workers are gathered in the field as the last of the grain is gathered and Charlotte recites a rhyme before everyone celebrates in the night. Reverend Denning says it has been a strange summer. Foreman Gideon apologises to Peter for what his nephew Jack did. Nathan intrudes on the conversation and asks what Peter thinks. ‘water under the bridge’ and Nathan tells Gideon to get himself a drink.

Then Nathan and his wife dance as everyone around them sings. Nathan says he feels so alive. SO SO ALIVE. NOTHING WRONG CAN HAPPEN NOW.

Then of course we need a cliffhanger mysterious stinger to keep you watching the rest of the series at this halfway point. Cut to a wet child holding a toy wooden yacht watching them. This won’t be covered in the next episode so it’s a random tease of Gabriel who was stated to have drowned in the lake.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03z7h8b/player


Review

There is a theme of anti-intellectualism by the common folk in today’s episode. Poor, poor, landowners being put upon by their indentured serf workforce. It is a good episode in that capacity but the series long arc regarding the Applebys takes away time from developing what would have been a far more evocative narrative.

Wait Peter didn’t die? But he isn’t seen anywhere in the rest of the series and [spoilers which you would expect his reaction to]. What happened to him? I don’t think it is explained and I spent the rest of the series under the impression he was dead.

The ending part reminds me of ‘How Green Was My Valley’ as it seems the leads have no concept what they perceive is a very rose-tinted view of the community. The workers are not celebrating their own work, not they are celebrating their masters the Applebys.

There is nothing very supernatural here really as they present Peter as delusional throughout never as someone being haunted. It also becomes jarring as we are never shown Peter seeking isolation or other things which would imply secretive behaviour. He is a misfit but otherwise seems to keep in line until the events of this episode which amount to Gideon seeing him out early one day. PErhaps the creators thought what was presented was enough but I feel an extra scene with him talking to himself in front of other village folk, not just Nathan which might have been a one-off event, would make us understand the persecution more. Presenting irrational persecution as purely irrational, giving no reason for people to single Peter out until now, doesn’t make sense in and of itself.

As a counter point we are presented with Gwen’s hedge witch behaviour (which is how she defines herself later in the series).I have to wonder if the village folk know of it or if it is kept secret (aside from Nathan and Charlotte knowing of it). If they killed Clarity for her abilities wouldn’t they also want to kill Gwen? Admittedly maybe Clarity’s ability was miraculous while Gwen’s are herbal, thus traditional and ‘good’ in the minds of the village folk, but still there seems to be double standards. We never really learn much about Gwen during the series either – she just appears in one scene after the Appleby’s arrival and she is already Charlotte’s righthand woman. Do they protect her from persecution? It makes no really sense in the narrative as everything else seems fair game for challenging by the Applebys’ modern perspective in criticising their workforce.


 

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Has anyone been watching this? It seems to not know which audience it wants to aim for and thus tries to be something to everyone but ends up nothing to anyone.

A delay on uploading as I was busy. The BBC apparently have stopped uploading preview clips to YouTube and their embed function on their own series page just gives the link not an embedded video. They also stopped doing episode specific galleries (correction they are just delayed by a fortnight or so which is fine as the images will be up prior to an international audience seeing the series but for Brits its a disservice). They must already have given up on promoting the series seriously for the British audience a third of the way into it’s run which is a shame as someone probably took promotion photos and everything and now won’t see the fruits of their labour… or maybe there will be a tie-in book with all of it in. Probably not but it used to be a given the BBC would do that with many series. I like the production design I just feel it’s scripts are not focused on depicting things effectively.